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Cycling in Falkirk

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Latest photos of the area

See also a full list of photos in this area.

A barrier on the track up to the Union Canal.

Surface dressing at the Carradale Avenue junction on Glenfuir Road.

Another barrier in Summerford Park.

I'm not sure who is welcome to Summerford Park. I had to turn my handlebars sideways and lift the front wheel to get through this.

Filtered permeability on Summerford Road.

On the way to the park at Summerford, but there's no dropped kerb to join the path.

A short length of path near the Forth & Clyde Canal. If only it went further.

The towpath on the Forth & Clyde Canal merges into the footway of the adjacent road at Lock 16. Signage includes directions to the Union Canal, although the route is just along the main road.

The path on the other side of the Forth & Clyde Canal from the main towpath. I assume the 'Cyclists Dismount' sign up ahead means that cycling is allowed along this path.

The path on the other side of the Forth & Clyde Canal. The main towpath is across the water.

If the footway is narrow, of course the roadworks will block the full width.

The Westburn Avenue shared-use footway crosses Westburn Avenue to get to the signalled crossing on Glenfuir Road and the bridge over the canal to the main towpath. The footway widening doesn't quite make it to the end of the shared footway.

The Westburn Avenue shared footway crossing Blinkbonny Road.

The Westburn Avenue shared-use footway passes a caged pedestrian crossing.

A cycle workstand opposite a cycle shop in Falkirk High Street.

An area map and the Falkirk Active Travel Hub in the High Street.

I initially thought this was some kind of time-restricted 'No Entry' but on closer inspection the plate underneath is for loading restrictions.

A major junction in Falkirk town centre. The road ahead on the left is restricted for motor vehicles to local buses and loading (see #101534).

End of the cycle lane and part-time bus lane on Camelon Road, and start of Falkirk town centre's one-way system.

In theory the bus lane should help separate the cycle lane from the traffic in the general traffic lane, but almost all of the car drivers were choosing to drive in the bus lane outside of operational hours.

The start of a narrow painted cycle lane on Camelon Road, just after a collapsing gully at a bus stop.

The main road around Falkirk town centre doesn't look very cycle-friendly.

Kirk Wynd looking towards the High Street, with a taxi parked across the courtesy crossing.

Bus priority in Falkirk doesn't extend as far as traffic signal detection.

Lint Riggs is part of the pedestrianised area in Falkirk town centre, and connects Upper Newmarket Street to the High Street.

Upper Newmarket Street is restricted for motor vehicles to loading and local bus services.

No Cycling in the High Street, 11am to 4pm. Not strictly observed.

'Cyclists Dismount' for going under the bridge with poor sightlines at Camelon Road. Why not just 'go slowly'?

'Cyclists Dismount' for going under the bridge with poor sightlines at Camelon Road. Why not just 'go slowly'?

The way to avoid the steps at #101523 is to take the A9 road bridge across the railway, and the HArTT cycle route appears to do just that. However, there is no evidence that the narrow footway is legal for shared use, and the provision ... [more]

As with #101515 the railway blocks progress along the Forth & Clyde Canal towpath, and a flight of steps provides the connection to the adjacent A9 road bridge.

The view the opposite way to #101520, and the end of an unspecified cycle route. The HArTT cycle route comes through here too, but is without a sign.

A newly resurfaced path to Camelon at the Sunnyside playing fields. Plenty of gradients.

Various signs but no mention of the HArTT cycle route which comes through here and along the path to Bainsford according to the council's map. See also #101522.

An uncontrolled crossing of the A9 in Falkirk. See also #101518.

A path leading to an uncontrolled crossing of the A9 (see #101519) and the Sunnyside playing fields. Although the HArTT cycle route goes past either end of this path, it uses a signalled crossing of the A9 further to the north.

On the Forth & Clyde Canal towpath approaching the railway and steps at #101515.

The immediate way around the blockage in #101515 is to use this flight of steps up to the A9 bridge to cross the railway. The alternative is to use the road approach to the bridge to avoid the steps.

The railway crosses the canal here and blocks the towpath. There are steps up to an adjacent road bridge to the right (see #101516).

The Forth & Clyde Canal towpath has LED catseyes on this section in Falkirk.

A short section on-road at Bankside to avoid the steps in #101138.

Cycle parking outside the shopping mall.

The A9 shared-use footway/cycleway turns a corner into Mungalend and just ends. The A9 itself continues without any cycle provision. The car parked on the footway across the junction has 'for sale' notices in the window. Buy from a pavem ... [more]

A poorly filled trench across the shared-use footway/cycleway alongside the A9, and a 'Cyclists Dismount' sign at the pedestrian crossing. The shared footway continues (for a short distance) beyond the crossing.

Posts for the huge motorist sign have been kept (almost) out of the way of the cycleway.

Unlike the provision for crossing to Abbotsford Business Park, where left and right turns are catered for instead of forced right-angled turns, the path to Hayfield is made difficult to use with a chicane barrier.

Left and right turns catered for at the Abbotsford Business Park junction on the A9 shared footway/cycleway, instead of the usual forced right-angled turn.

Low hanging branches above the A9 shared-use footway.

The shared-use footway alongside the A9 crosses sides for some reason.

The shared-use footway alongside the A9 crosses sides for some reason, as well as crossing the side roads to industrial estates.

The shared-use footway alongside the A9 crosses sides for some reason, although there appears to be room for it to stay on the same side. There's even a signalled crossing in about half a mile or so.

The shared-use footway alongside the A9 crosses sides for some reason, although there's a choice of going clockwise or anti-clockwise around the roundabout. But someone going to Abbotsford Business Park has to cross the A9 twice.

The shared footway alongside the A9, with a warning for drivers of the crossing up ahead.

No provision for joining the ramp down to the Forth & Clyde Canal directly coming from the west, so must make sharp turn. Maybe not the most popular direction to approach from, but would have been easy to build at the same time as the rest ... [more]

The turnoff from the A9 shared footway for the ramp down to the Forth & Clyde Canal, including a marker post for the HArTT cycle route.

The Forth & Clyde Canal towpath at the junction with the ramp up to the A9 bridge, and with the Kelpies in the background.

A sign warning of the path junction up ahead. There's another beyond the junction facing the wrong way.

A sign warning of a path joining from the right. It's more of a dirt path than an actual cycle track.

A metal barrier and a parked Falkirk Council van blocking the shared footway/cycleway at the A9 roundabout.

Signs for motorists are bigger.

Signage in the Helix park, including a badge for the HArTT cycle route.

More arrivals from the direction of a car park.

Barriers across an exit from the Helix park.

Signage in the Helix park, including a badge on the post for the HArTT cycle route.

Signage in the Helix park.

The Helix park - "A place to cycle" - but I didn't see many more adult bikes besides these two. An out of town park that most people drive to.

Barriers at the entrance to the main part of the Helix park. The other side of the toucan crossing has bollards.

The staggered toucan crossing connecting the main Helix park and the football stadium (and car park). The central island is quite narrow and negotiation is required when people are passing in opposite directions.

The path between the football stadium and the main section of the Helix park.

Helix signage outside the football stadium.

A counter on the way into the Helix park.

Needless barriers at the Laurieston Road entrance to the Helix park. What are dismounted cyclists to do when there's no footway on the road ahead?

Needless barriers at the Laurieston Road entrance to the Helix park.

The start of the not exactly terribly wide shared-use footway along Westburn Avenue. It doesn't look much different from the bit that isn't shared-use.

This really is the end of the cycle route, since Laurieston Road has no cycle facilities and has quite a bit of lorry traffic.

The path to Laurieston Road passes between an industrial estate and a railway line.

The path, rather than coming to an end as the sign suggests, crosses the A9 at grade, and continues across the far side. There is also a shared-use footway alongside the A9 to the right.

An uncontrolled at-grade crossing of the A9 road, on the path to the Helix park.

Approaching the A9 crossing. Only the railway gets a bridge.

A sign for the Helix park.

One missing bollard at the end of Bog Road and the joyriders are out taking advantage of it. When is the motoring community going to get to grips with this sort of behaviour?

The end of Bog Road is blocked off at Callendar Road and only pedestrians are allowed through. See also #101207.

A safe route linking Bog Road to Callendar Boulevard along Callendar Road would provide a direct route between the Helix and Callendar Park. Even upgrading the footway to shared-use and putting in a crossing would probably suffice.

The cycle lane has been painted the wrong way around. Such incompetence!

A big sign for the roundabout at the end of Callendar Boulevard, but motorway regulations do not apply immediately on the road to the right. This sign is in effect a 'No Turn Right' sign for non-motorway traffic, and completely bogus.

The car parking in the Callendar Boulevard painted cycle lanes resumes, but with no waiting restrictions to force drivers to take their cars to the car parks, it appears the council approves.

A break in the car parking to see the narrow painted cycle lanes.

The exit from Callendar Park onto Callendar Boulevard, where cars are regularly left blocking the painted cycle lanes.

Exit from Callendar Park.

A route sign for the HArTT cycle route, directing cyclists onto the A9. There is no evidence to be seen that the footway on this section is legal for shared-use.

A route sign for the HArTT cycle route, but most definitely not the most direct route to the Helix and Kelpies. Could the writing on these signs be any smaller?

Pedalos on the lake at Callendar Park.

The bike shed alongside Callendar House. The notice says to ask at reception if you wish to use it.

Callendar House in Callendar Park, with bike shed alongside.

A sign for the HArTT cycle route, the park café, and people enjoying the amenities in Callendar Park.

A junction of tracks in Callendar Woods. I saw a few people jogging through the woods, but no-one else cycling.

A marker post for a blue route in Callendar Woods.

A track in Callendar Woods. Nice views, but the surface is not so good for cycling.

A track in Callendar Woods.

A marker post for the HArTT cycle route entering Callendar Woods. The asphalt comes to an end.

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